OP Recordings

Media Files

  • Romeo and Juliet – Prologue 1

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  • Sonnet-1

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  • Sonnet-116

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  • Troilus and Cressida Act 1 Scene 1

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Supporting Documents

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For the two productions at Shakespeare’s Globe, I made a recording of the whole of each play (using the text chosen and cut by the directors) to help the actors get a feel for the accent. These were made in 2004 (for Romeo) and 2005 (for Troilus). A complete OP reading of the Sonnets was made at the request of sonneteer Will Sutton in 2007. Information about how to obtain these recordings is given below. 

Shakespeare’s Globe keeps a video of all its productions, including the OP performances, and Friends of the Globe or bona fide researchers can view these, upon application to the librarian. See the information here.

The Globe also made a 20-minute CD of five of the Troilus cast performing some of their speeches. This is also available to interested scholars if they get in touch with me.

US dialectologist Paul Meier has produced an eBook for actors called Voicing Shakespeare, and there is a great deal of OP material on his site at http://www.paulmeier.com/shakespeare.html. The site also contains information about his OP production of A Midsummer NIght’s Dream at Kansas University in November 2010.

I hope more people and companies will experiment with OP, to hear the effect it has on our auditory experience of the plays and poems, and to hear alternative interpretations to my own.

Since 2005 there have been several other productions in OP, such as Hamlet (at the University of Nevada, Reno, in November 2011), and there has been growing interest from other fields involved with pronunciation in the Jacobethan period, such as early music, heritage, and bible reading.

If anyone is planning to work with this genre, there is now a dedicated OP site where people can share such information here, where news of your productions and plans will be posted.